14 March 2013

Chwee Kueh (Steamed Rice Cake 水粿)


One of the popular breakfast in Singapore is...Chwee Kueh. It is a steamed rice cake which topped with preserved radish, usually it go with chili sauce. I bought my small cup shape containers from Singapore and today it is just right to put them into good use. I have a few recipes with me on how to make chwee kueh, eventually I landed on Anncoo Journal recipe. Thanks Ann for sharing her recipe and the problem she encountered, I changed the water content a bit and added wheat starch, it makes my first chwee kueh a successful one. The texture of the chwee kueh is soft and smooth! I think I'm lucky!






Topping (Chye Por) ingredients from Ah Tze's kitchen play
100g chye por
15g chopped garlic
15g minced shallots
100ml water

seasonings:
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp light soy sauce
1 tsp dark soy sauce
1 tsp sesame oil
dash of pepper

Method:
1. Soak chye por in water for about 10 mins to remove excess salt. Heat up 3 tbsp oil, fry garlic and shallots over low heat till golden brown. 
2. Add in chye por and seasonings. Add in water, simmer for 10 mins or until the water dry out. Stir constantly to prevent burning. Set aside for later use.



Recipe adapted from Anncoo Journal with changes 

Chwee Kueh ingredients:
150g rice flour
15g tapioca flour
10g corn flour
10g wheat starch flour
1 tbsp canola oil (or sunflower oil)
400ml water

250ml water + 1/2 tsp salt

Method:
1. Mix all flour ingredients with 400ml water and set aside for 15 mins.
2. Boil 250ml water with 1/2 tsp salt and our the boiling water into the flour mixture, stir well.
3. Grease the small cup mould with oil and warm up the mould in steamer.
4. Stir well the flour liquid, pour it into the hot moulds and steam for 12-15 mins.
5. Let the rice cake cool down and scoop out from mould using a small palette knife. 
6. Top with preserved radish before serving.




20 comments:

  1. Tze, your chwee kuih look really smooth. Thanks for the adjustment on the water content. Will follow yours when I make this again :)

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    Replies
    1. Ann, thanks for your recipe, my son love the chwee kuehs!

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  2. tze,这个非常好吃,我也做了。得空会分享。

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  3. Replies
    1. It is selling Singapore $1 for four, and I can get it easily from the market but now, can't find it anywhere when I'm craving for Asian snack.

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  4. Tze, this is one of my fav kuih... Urs looks so smooth and great !! I remembered my first attempt was a disaster...the kuih like turn out so ugly ..hehe...

    My husband doesn't like this at all .. it have to finish all by myself ..after eating the whole batch (about 10) I kind of jelak already..

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    Replies
    1. Li Shuan, i was only lucky on my first attempt. Thanks to Ann's tips and sharing her recipe. My kueh usually didn't turn out well on first attempt too :)

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  5. Although I'm not keen on savory kind of dessert, looking at yours make me feel like having some. Love to eat with chili!

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    Replies
    1. Vivian, my hubby also love to eat chwee kueh with chili but i still need to figure out how to make that type of chili :D

      Delete
  6. I noticed the various different flours used - tapioca, corn and wheat starch flour. Don't they all serve the same purpose - thickening agent? Is wheat starch the same as normal wheat flour? Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Celine, to be honest with you, I don't have an answer to you as this is my first chwee kueh making too :)

      usually in kueh making, the recipe involved a few type of flour to get the right texture which we want. For instance, you can't substitute tapioca flour with corn flour and so on. They serve different function in kueh making. They are not purely thickening agent. The wheat starch is commonly used in kueh making, it is not the normal wheat flour, they are different thing.

      In this chwee kueh recipe, if base on my limited knowledge if you insist which one can be omitted, I would say corn flour. You can google about the different types of flour and their use on Internet if you want to know more about them.

      Hopefully I have answer your question.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for your reply. Now I have to wonder where to get the wheat starch flour. Is it available at cake specialty shops?

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    3. Are you in oz too? If yes, you can get wheat starch from Asian groceries shop.

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    4. I'm from Malaysia, and managed to buy the various flours from specialty baking shop. So the next thing is cooking it.

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  7. Hi Tze
    I am a chwee kueh fan. I will try your recipe and hopefully this is the recipe I am looking for ~ soft and smooth. Thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Mel, thanks for coming over. Yes, hopefully we have the same taste buds ;)

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  8. Hi. Is that the sweet or salty radish?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. yal, the radish is salty one, you can use sweet radish as you wish!

      Delete
  9. Hi Ah Tze

    Tks for the modification of this Chwee Kuih recipe. It was a success for me at first attempt. My family loves it very much but unfortunately not enough to go round coz managed to yield only 10 little rice bowls. But nevertheless I will make more again. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete

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